Cipramil (Citalopram) is used for the treatment of depression and when you feel better, to help prevent these symptoms recurring. Further, Cipramil is used for long-term treatment to prevent the occurrence of new depressive episodes in patients who have recurrent depression.

Why have I been prescribed Cipramil?

  • Cipramil (Citalopram) is used for the treatment of depression and when you feel better, to help prevent these symptoms recurring.
  • Further, Cipramil is used for long-term treatment to prevent the occurrence of new depressive episodes in patients who have recurrent depression.
  • Cipramil is also beneficial in relieving symptoms in patients prone to panic attacks.
  • Your doctor, however, may prescribe Cipramil for another purpose. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Cipramil has been prescribed for you.

How does it work?

Cipramil contains an antidepressant drug called an SSRI. It increases the amount of a chemical (serotonin) in the brain which is known to be lowered in depression.

When and how do I take it?

  • Cipramil is taken every day as a single daily dose.
  • Cipramil can be taken any time of the day with or without food.
  • Swallow the tablets with a drink of water. Do not chew them (they have a bitter taste).

What’s the dose?

Adults:

Depression

  • The usual dose is 20 mg per day. This may be increased by your doctor to a maximum of 60 mg per day.

Panic disorder

  • The starting dose is 10 mg per day for the first week before increasing the dose to 20-30 mg per day. The dose may be increased by your doctor to a maximum of 60 mg per day.

Elderly patients (above 65 years of age)

  • Elderly patients should not usually receive more than 40 mg per day.

Could it interact with other tablets?

Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines, including medicines obtained without prescription.

Some drugs may affect the action of another and this can sometimes cause serious adverse reactions.

When using Cipramil with the following medicines, caution should be exercised:

  • lithium (used in the prophylaxis and treatment of manic-depressive disorder) and tryptophan; if you get high fever and abrupt contractions of muscles, feel agitated and confused you must see your doctor immediately.
  • selegiline (used for Parkinson's disease); the dose of selegiline must not exceed 10 mg per day.
  • metoprolol (used for high blood pressure and/or heart disease); the blood levels of metoprolol are increased, but signs of increased effect or side effects of metoprolol have not been recorded.
  • sumatriptan and similar medicines (used to treat migraine); risk of side effects; if you get any unusual symptoms when using this combination you should see your doctor.
  • cimetidine, when used in high doses (used to treat stomach ulcers); blood levels of Cipramil may be increased but increased side effects of Cipramil have not been recorded.
  • drugs known to affect the platelet function (e.g. some antipsychotic drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, acetylsalicylic acid (used as pain killers), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (used for arthritis); slightly increased risk of bleeding abnormalities.
  • St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) - concomitant intake with Cipramil may increase the risk of side effects.

What are the possible risks or side-effects?

Some patients have reported the following serious side effects.

If you get any of the following symptoms you should stop taking Cipramil and see your doctor immediately:

  • • high fever, agitation, confusion, trembling and abrupt contractions of muscles; these may be signs of a rare condition called serotonin syndrome which has been reported with the combined use of antidepressants
  • • If you experience swelling of skin, tongue, lips, or face, or have difficulties breathing or swallowing (allergic reaction)
  • • Unusual bleeds, including gastrointestinal bleeds

Very common side effects (in more than 1 out of 10 persons) may include:

  • Feeling sleepy
  • Sleeplessness
  • Increased sweating
  • Dry mouth
  • Nausea (feeling sick)

Common side effects (in more than 1 but less than 10 out of 100 patients) may include:

  • Decreased appetite
  • Agitation
  • Decreased sex drive
  • Anxiety
  • Nervousness
  • Confusion state
  • Tremor
  • Ringing in the ears (tinnitus)
  • Yawning
  • Diarrhoea
  • Vomiting
  • Itching
  • Pain in muscle and joints
  • Men may experience problems with ejaculation and erection, For females, failure to achieve an orgasm
  • Fatigue
  • Prickling of the skin
  • Decreased weight.

Can I drink alcohol while taking it?

  • Cipramil has been shown not to increase the effects of alcohol. Nevertheless, it is recommended not to drink alcohol during treatment with Cipramil.

What if I’m pregnant/breastfeeding?

  • Pregnant women should not usually take Cipramil nor should mothers breast-feed their babies while taking this medicine. If absolutely necessary your doctor may tell you to continue taking cipramil while pregnant or breast feeding.


If you have any more questions please ask your Pharmacist.

Remember to keep all medicines out of reach of children
Please Note:
 We have made every effort to ensure that the content of this information sheet is correct at time of publish, but remember that information about drugs may change. This sheet does not list all the uses and side-effects associated with this drug. For full details please see the drug information leaflet which comes with your medicine. Your doctor will assess your medical circumstances and draw your attention to any information or side-effects which may be relevant in your particular case.

References:

http://patient.info/medicine/citalopram-cipramil-paxoran

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citalopram

https://www.hpra.ie/img/uploaded/swedocuments/2145702.PPA0465_068_002.c1bd5957-421d-4b67-a53d-6c87f38c2bcc.000001Product%20Leaflet%20Approved.141013.pdf

http://www.drugs.com/uk/cipramil-10mg-film-coated-tablets-leaflet.html

http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/medicines/depression/a6409/cipramil-citalopram/

http://www.mydr.com.au/medicines/cmis/cipramil-tablets

 

Health Reference: Depression