Imodium (Loperamide) is used to treat sudden, shortlived (acute) attacks of diarrhoea in adults and children 4 years and over and long-lasting (chronic) diarrhoea in adults. It works by making the stools more solid and less frequent.

Why have I been prescribed Imodium?

  • Imodium (Loperamide) is used to treat sudden, shortlived (acute) attacks of diarrhoea in adults and children 4 years and over and long-lasting (chronic) diarrhoea in adults.
  • It works by making the stools more solid and less frequent.

How does it work?

Imodium reduces the increased contraction of the gut seen in diarrhoea, and results in more water being absorbed from the gut.

When and how do I take it?

Swallow the correct number of capsules whole with some liquid.

What’s the dose?

Acute diarrhoea:

Adults and Children aged 9-12 years:

  • Take one or two capsules to begin with and then one capsule three times daily. Never take more than 5 capsules in any 24 hour period.

Children aged 4-8 years:

  • Capsules are not recommended for this age group.

Chronic diarrhoea:

Adults only:

  • Your doctor will tell you how much Imodium to take. The initial dose will probably be between two and four capsules per day taken in divided doses. Never take more than 5 capsules in any 24 hour period.

Could it interact with other tablets?

  • Always tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any other medicines because taking some medicines together can be harmful.
  • You should not take any other antidiarrhoeal medicines whilst taking Imodium (except for oral rehydration therapy).
  • Herbal products should also only be taken after talking with your doctor.

What are the possible risks or side-effects?

  • Like all medicines Imodium may occasionally cause side effects. It is very rare to experience the following symptoms after taking Imodium: tummy cramps, feeling sick, vomiting, indigestion, constipation and skin reactions, including nettlerash. Loss of consciousness or decreased level of consciousness may also occur very rarely.
  • Allergic reactions to Imodium are very rare. An allergic reaction can be recognised, for instance, by skin rash, itching, shortness of breath or swollen face. If any of these signs occurs, stop taking Imodium and see your doctor.
  • Severe bloated tummy or stoppage of bowel activity or difficulty urinating have been reported. If this should occur, stop taking Imodium and contact your doctor for advice. If your medicine affects you in any other way, you should tell your doctor or pharmacist.

Can I drink alcohol while taking it?

  • There are no known interactions between alcohol and Imodium
  • Always ask you doctor or pharmacist however as other medications you are taking may have a bearing on this.

What if I’m pregnant/breastfeeding?

If you are pregnant, think you might be pregnant or are planning to become pregnant, you should talk to your doctor who will decide if you can take Imodium.

Do not take Imodium if you are breast feeding as small amounts of the medicine may get into your milk. You should talk to your doctor about suitable treatment.

 

If you have any more questions please ask your Pharmacist.

Remember to keep all medicines out of reach of children
Please Note:
We have made every effort to ensure that the content of this information sheet is correct at time of publish, but remember that information about drugs may change. This sheet does not list all the uses and side-effects associated with this drug. For full details please see the drug information leaflet which comes with your medicine. Your doctor will assess your medical circumstances and draw your attention to any information or side-effects which may be relevant in your particular case.

References:

http://www.medbroadcast.com/Drug/GetDrug/Imodium

http://www.imodium.com/

http://www.drugs.com/imodium.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loperamide