Librium capsules are used for the short-term treatment of anxiety, which may occur alone or in association with insomnia or psychotic illnesses. Librium may also be used to treat muscle spasms, and to relieve symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal.

Why have I been prescribed Librium?

  • Librium capsules are used for the short-term treatment of anxiety, which may occur alone or in association with insomnia or psychotic illnesses.
  • Librium may also be used to treat muscle spasms, and to relieve symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal.

How does it work?

  • Librium belongs to a group of medicines called benzodiazepines.
  • These work by increasing the amount of a certain chemical in the brain which calms the brain down and stops the nerves firing inappropriately.

When and how do I take it?

Always take the capsules as your doctor tells you to. Your doctor will advise you when to stop taking the medicine. Please remember that it is not suitable for long-term use and that, after a few weeks, it is worth trying to get by without it.

This will help to prevent you becoming used to it and reduce the risk of dependence.

What’s the dose?

Usually anywhere between 10 and 30mg daily. Max of 100mg daily. All in divided doses.

Could it interact with other tablets?

Please tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines. This includes medicines that you buy without a prescription and herbal medicines. This is because Librium can affect the way some other medicines work. Also some other medicines can affect the way Librium works.

In particular, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any of the following medicines:

  • antipsychotics (neuroleptics)
  • hypnotics
  • anxiolytics/sedatives
  • antidepressant agents
  • narcotic analgesics
  • anti-epileptic drugs
  • anaesthetics and sedative antihistamines.

Herbal products should also only be taken after talking with your doctor.

What are the possible risks or side-effects?

In addition to the beneficial effects of Librium, it is possible that unwanted effects may occur during use, even when used as directed by your doctor.

These effects may include:

  • drowsiness
  • tiredness
  • unsteadiness
  • muscular discoordination

If you are an elderly patient, you may be more susceptible to side-effects and may suffer from confusion. Other side-effects include headache, vertigo, low blood pressure, stomach upsets, skin rashes, visual disturbances, changes in libido and urinary retention.

Rare instances of blood dyscrasias (an abnormal condition of the blood), jaundice and abnormal behavioural reactions such as aggression, excitement, confusion and depression with thoughts of suicide have also been reported.

Can I drink alcohol while taking it?

  • Do not drink alcohol with this medicine.

What if I’m pregnant/breastfeeding?

Normally pregnant women should not take these capsules. It is important to tell your doctor if you are pregnant or think you could be pregnant. If you are taking these capsules you should avoid breast-feeding.

 

If you have any more questions please ask your Pharmacist.

Remember to keep all medicines out of reach of children
Please Note:
We have made every effort to ensure that the content of this information sheet is correct at time of publish, but remember that information about drugs may change. This sheet does not list all the uses and side-effects associated with this drug. For full details please see the drug information leaflet which comes with your medicine. Your doctor will assess your medical circumstances and draw your attention to any information or side-effects which may be relevant in your particular case.

References:

https://www.medicines.org.uk/emc/medicine/10537

http://www.rxlist.com/librium-drug.htm

http://www.drugs.com/cdi/librium.html

http://xpil.medicines.org.uk/ViewPil.aspx?DocID=15891