Propylthiouracil Tablets are used in the treatment and management of an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism).

Why have I been prescribed Propylthiouracil?

Propylthiouracil Tablets are used in the treatment and management of an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism).

How does it work?

These medicines work by reducing the production of a hormone called thyroxine by the thyroid gland (a gland located beneath the voice box in the throat that produces thyroid hormone and helps to regulate growth and metabolism).

When and how do I take it?

Unless instructed differently, take your tablets with a glass of water

What’s the dose?

Adults and the elderly

  • The usual adult starting dose for Propylthiouracil Tablets is 300 to 600mg once a day, or in divided doses, until your condition is controlled. When your condition has been controlled (usually after one to two months) the dose is reduced to 50 to 150mg daily and continued for one to two years.

Propylthiouracil Tablets are not recommended for use in children under six years of age.

Children aged six to ten years of age

  • In children aged six to ten years, the usual starting dose is 50 to 150mg once daily or in divided doses.

Children over ten years of age

  • In children over ten years, the usual starting dose is 150 to 300mg once daily or in divided doses.

Could it interact with other tablets?

Taking another medicine while you are taking Propylthiouracil Tablets can affect how it or the other medicine works. Please inform your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines including those you may have bought yourself without a prescription.

Especially tell your doctor if you are taking:

  • Theophylline, a drug used to treat asthma
  • Digoxin, used to treat problems with the rhythm of your heart
  • Beta-blockers, used to treat high blood pressure

Herbal supplements should be used with caution and only after informing your doctor first.

What are the possible risks or side-effects?

Like many medicines Propylthiouracil Tablets may cause side effects in some patients, although not everybody gets them. You should contact your doctor immediately if you develop any of the following side effects affecting your blood or liver, or if you think you have any type of infection:

Symptoms of a serious problem affecting your blood:

  • sore throat
  • fever
  • mouth ulcers
  • unusual bleeding or unexplained bruising
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • feeling generally unwell.

Your doctor should check your blood if you develop an infection or if you are about to undergo surgery. You may need to stop your tablets if you have any blood problems.

Symptoms of hepatitis (inflammation of your liver) or other forms of liver Damage:

  • loss of appetite
  • itching
  • pain on the right side of your stomach
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes)
  • a brain disease, which may affect your ability to think

You should contact your doctor immediately if you develop any of the above side effects.

You should also contact your doctor immediately if you develop an allergic reaction, the symptoms of which are as follows:

  • difficulty in breathing
  • cough
  • swelling of your lymph glands (glands situated around the body which protect against the spread of infection)
  • arthritis (painful joints)
  • pain in the loins (lower back) or other symptoms of kidney problems
  • inflammation of your blood vessels (of the skin)
  • a rash across the bridge of your nose and across your cheeks

Other less serious side effects include:

  • feeling sick or being sick
  • stomach upsets
  • taste disturbance
  • headaches
  • mild skin rashes
  • itching or reddening of the skin
  • hair loss
  • pain or stiffness of your muscles or joints

If any of these other side effects get serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet, please contact your doctor or pharmacist immediately.

Can I drink alcohol while taking it?

  • Propylthiouracil may cause drowsiness. These effects may be worse if you take it with alcohol.
  • Always ask your doctor/pharmacist however as this may depend on what other tablets you are taking.

What if I’m pregnant/breastfeeding?

You should let your doctor know if you are pregnant or trying to become pregnant before taking Propylthiouracil Tablets. Propylthiouracil Tablets may be taken during pregnancy but it may affect your unborn child’s thyroid gland. If you need to take Propylthiouracil Tablets during pregnancy, you should be given the lowest effective dose and your thyroid function should be checked every four to six weeks.

You should inform your doctor if you are breast-feeding or wish to start breast-feeding whilst taking Propylthiouracil Tablets. If you need to take Propylthiouracil Tablets whilst you are breast-feeding, you should be given the lowest effective dose and the infant’s development and thyroid function should be monitored.


If you have any more questions please ask your Pharmacist.

Remember to keep all medicines out of reach of children
Please Note:
We have made every effort to ensure that the content of this information sheet is correct at time of publish, but remember that information about drugs may change. This sheet does not list all the uses and side-effects associated with this drug. For full details please see the drug information leaflet which comes with your medicine. Your doctor will assess your medical circumstances and draw your attention to any information or side-effects which may be relevant in your particular case.

References:

http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/ucm209256.htm

http://www.medicinenet.com/propylthiouracil/article.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propylthiouracil

http://www.drugs.com/cdi/propylthiouracil.html