Rebif (Interferon) is used for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis. MS is said to be relapsing if you have had two or more acute episodes in the last two years.

Why have I been prescribed Rebif?

  • Rebif (Interferon) is used for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis.
  • MS is said to be relapsing if you have had two or more acute episodes in the last two years.

How does it work?

Multiple sclerosis is linked to nerve (brain or spinal cord) damage. In MS, your body’s defence system reacts against it’s own myelin – the ‘insulation’ that surrounds nerve fibres. When myelin is damaged, the messages between the brain and other parts of the body are disrupted. This is what causes the symptoms of MS. Rebif seems to work by stopping your body’s defence system from attacking the myelin.

When and how do I take it?

  • Rebif is injected under the skin three times a week. You will receive training on how to do this. See the leaflet that comes with the injection for instructions on how to inject it.
  • A different injection site should be used each time.
  • Store in the fridge but allow return to room temperature before use.

What’s the dose?

  • When first starting treatment with Rebif, it is recommended that 8.8 micrograms be administered by subcutaneous injection three times per week during the initial 2 weeks of therapy.
  • Thereafter, 22 micrograms be administered by subcutaneous injection three times per week in weeks 3 and 4, and the total of the 44 micrograms strength be administered from the fifth week onwards.

Could it interact with other tablets?

  • If you are using any other medicines, especially those used to treat epilepsy or depression, tell your doctor or pharmacist as Rebif may affect other medicines or be affected by them.
  • This includes any other medicines including medicines obtained without a prescription.

Herbal products should also only be taken after talking with your doctor.

What are the possible risks or side-effects?

The most common side effects are flu like symptoms while using Rebif. Other common side effects are:

Can I drink alcohol while taking it?

  • There are no known interactions between alcohol and Rebif.
  • Always ask you doctor or pharmacist however as other medications you are taking may have a bearing on this.

What if I’m pregnant/breastfeeding?

If you are pregnant do not start using Rebif.

  • If you could get pregnant, you need to use contraception while you use Rebif.
  • If you are planning a baby or if you become pregnant while you are using Rebif, tell your doctor. You and your doctor can discuss if you should carry on with treatment.
  • If you are already pregnant, or think that you might be, talk to a doctor as soon as you can.
  • If you want to breastfeed talk to your doctor first.

If you have any more questions please ask your Pharmacist.

Remember to keep all medicines out of reach of children
Please Note:
We have made every effort to ensure that the content of this information sheet is correct at time of publish, but remember that information about drugs may change. This sheet does not list all the uses and side-effects associated with this drug. For full details please see the drug information leaflet which comes with your medicine. Your doctor will assess your medical circumstances and draw your attention to any information or side-effects which may be relevant in your particular case.

References:

http://www.ndrugs.com/?s=redif

http://www.medicines.ie/medicine/14461/SPC/Rebif+solution+for+injection+in+cartridges/